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  •  Anonymous
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olympics history
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olympic was the oldest sister the first one to go to service and the only one to go to the scrap yard and olympics nick name in the wa was old besty she ramed a sub maren in the war olympics was launched bye harlond and wolf and it was the property of imm line big american company and she was the property of white star line wich got borght out bye cunard in 1935 and the foling year olympic was sent to the scrap yrad but she was a grand ship on of the besthw made and olympic had moderfications done to her in 1912 after titanics sinking wich lately will ciome famas
Posted on: 2006/7/10 17:08
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Re: olympics history
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I'm not quite sure why this is in the book trade section -- are you interested in books/articles on the Olympic?

Best wishes,

Mark.
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Mark Chirnside, Warwickshire, England.
'RMS Olympic: Titanic's Sister.'
Posted on: 2006/7/21 11:29
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  •  Cody123
      Cody123
Re: olympics history
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The olympics nickname was old relable not old best for titanic king you need to get staright on ur facts
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When you got nothing ,you got nothing to lose- Jack Dawson

My favourite ships-Titanic, Olympic,Brittanic,Lusitania,Mauretania,Adventure of the seas,Grandeur of the seas
Posted on: 2006/9/22 1:58
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Re: olympics history
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Quote:

Cody123 wrote:
The olympics nickname was old relable not old best


That was certainly one of her nicknames, maybe the most well known, yet there were others. 'Film Star Liner' cropped up several times in the 1920s, while another advertising slogan the WSL used was the 'Ship Magnificent.' It seemed to catch on as a nickname, too.

Best wishes,

Mark.
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Mark Chirnside, Warwickshire, England.
'RMS Olympic: Titanic's Sister.'
Posted on: 2006/9/22 12:35
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  •  MGY Friend
      MGY Friend
Re: olympics history
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Mark, since you are an expert on the Olympic, did she have two parlor suites like the Titanic? I think it was Cody123 that stated this, I was not sure about this.

As far as my knowlege goes, The Olympic did not have as many cabins as Titanic. Did this change over the years when she was renovated?
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"Why is it the ship beats the waves
when the waves are so many and
the ship is one?
The reason is that ship
has a purpose".

Sir Winston Churchill


www.mrmarshall.proboards62.com
Posted on: 2006/9/25 14:44
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Re: olympics history
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Hi MGY Friend,

Quote:
Mark, since you are an expert on the Olympic, did she have two parlor suites like the Titanic? I think it was Cody123 that stated this, I was not sure about this.


I'd call myself 'researcher' -- expert implies knowing everything there is to know, and I am sure I don't.

There are some points about the question that need considering. Both Olympic and Titanic had four 'parlour' suites in first class (in the sense that these suites each had a room exclusively devoted to being a lounge or 'parlour' and did not have any beds in it). On both ships, there were two parlour suites on each side: two on the port side aft of the forward grand staircase (one on B-deck and one on C-deck); and the same for the starboard side. However, Titanic was different in that the B-deck 'parlour suites' had a private promenade deck added (which Olympic's parlour suites never had).

Quote:
As far as my knowlege goes, The Olympic did not have as many cabins as Titanic. Did this change over the years when she was renovated?


Well, Titanic had more cabins forward on B-deck, and amidships on B-deck she had larger suites than Olympic. There are other changes that could be listed, but the statement is largely correct.

As for later years, Olympic did get some of Titanic's features (like cabins near the aft grand staircase landing on A-deck), and she received new suites (not cabins) *forward* of the grand staircase in 1929 that extended out to the ship's side. Even in 1913, however, some staterooms had become private bathrooms. By the late 1920s many more staterooms had been sacrificed to be converted into private bathrooms, so it's probably fair to say the statement applied even by the 1930s.

Best wishes,

Mark.
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Mark Chirnside, Warwickshire, England.
'RMS Olympic: Titanic's Sister.'
Posted on: 2006/9/25 14:59
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Re: olympics history
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As an aside, with her interchangable accommodation configured to maximise first class, Titanic was certified to carry 905 first class passengers, whereas Olympic was certified to carry 1,054 in 1911 -- but less than Titanic in all the numbers dating from 1913. However, while we're on the subject the figure for Olympic of 1,054 does seem a little questionable; and in light of differences such as three-berth and one-berth rooms, it would take some effort to do a more accurate count.

Best wishes,

Mark.
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Mark Chirnside, Warwickshire, England.
'RMS Olympic: Titanic's Sister.'
Posted on: 2006/9/25 15:02
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  •  MGY Friend
      MGY Friend
Re: olympics history
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Mark,

facinating! I did not think there was that much to consider. Thank you very much for your in depth response. It's forums like this that make me continue to use this site.

I have another question if you don't mind. Have you in any of your research came up with an answer for why the White Star Line never enclosed half of the A deck promenade windows on Olympic as they did on Titanic? If I remember correctly, the company enclosed the windows on Titanic aprarently so that the spray would not reach the 1st class passengers, or something like that.

Do you think that they did not want to make Olympic look any more like her lost sister? Or was it because of lack of funding or interest?

I find this question interesting, since Britannic's promenade also mirrored Titanic's to an extent, including a total enclosure of the aft well deck. If this was such an improvement, and they put it on the last of the trio, why did they pass on Olympic?
_________________
"Why is it the ship beats the waves
when the waves are so many and
the ship is one?
The reason is that ship
has a purpose".

Sir Winston Churchill


www.mrmarshall.proboards62.com
Posted on: 2006/9/25 18:48
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Re: olympics history
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Hi MGY friend,

I'm glad I was of some help to you.

Quote:

MGY Friend wrote:
I have another question if you don't mind. Have you in any of your research came up with an answer for why the White Star Line never enclosed half of the A deck promenade windows on Olympic as they did on Titanic?


I am aware that a 1929 proposal to glass-in the promenade deck on Olympic (following the 1928 glassing-in of Majestic's deck) was discounted on cost grounds, as WSL was stretched financially by then and Olympic's passenger lists were satisfactory so it wasn't worth it.

As for the pre-war period, I think Titanic was partly the answer, yet in light of Olympic's abundant enclosed promenade space on B-deck there was no need for additional enclosed promenade space; and the lifeboats, lowered the length of the boat deck, could be loaded more easily from A-deck when it was open.

Quote:
If I remember correctly, the company enclosed the windows on Titanic aprarently so that the spray would not reach the 1st class passengers, or something like that.


That's commonly suggested, yes; on the other hand, it also ensured some enclosed promenade space (with B-deck now used for suites), and raised her gross tonnage.

Quote:
I find this question interesting, since Britannic's promenade also mirrored Titanic's to an extent, including a total enclosure of the aft well deck. If this was such an improvement, and they put it on the last of the trio, why did they pass on Olympic?


Part of the answer lies, again, in differences. Britannic had some enclosed promenade areas on B-deck *forward*, more than Titanic but not as much as Olympic, while she had gantry davits that reduced the need to use A-deck for loading.

Best wishes,

Mark.
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Mark Chirnside, Warwickshire, England.
'RMS Olympic: Titanic's Sister.'
Posted on: 2006/9/25 19:05
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  •  MGY Friend
      MGY Friend
Re: olympics history
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Joined: 2006/7/7
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Thanks again Mark! Your awesome!!
_________________
"Why is it the ship beats the waves
when the waves are so many and
the ship is one?
The reason is that ship
has a purpose".

Sir Winston Churchill


www.mrmarshall.proboards62.com
Posted on: 2006/9/26 14:26
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